The dimensions of a Heighliner

in design

Spacing Guild Heighliner in Dune (1984)Spacing Guild Heighliners in The Dune EncyclopaediaSpacing Guild Heighliner from SyFy's Dune (2000)

Dune
The Spacing Guild Heighliner in Dune is one of the more iconic starships in science fiction. Helighliners serve as means of transportation, fulcrums for events and convenient plot devices throughout the books of the series. In the first novel, they were described as being of such gargantuan size that Duke Paul Atreides says:

‘A Heighliner is truly big. Its hold will tuck all of our frigates and transports into a little corner-we’ll be just one small part of the ship’s manifest.’

Heighliners were not described beyond this at all in the original six novels and were instead just a simple plot device to move Character A to Planet B.

Dune (1984)
In David Lynch’s 1984 film adaptation, Heighliner were giant ornate cylinders bisected by a deep trench along the major axis. The written impressions of massive and literally awesome size were depicted by the tiny hatch through which all the Atreides starships fit.

The Dune Encyclopaedia
The Dune Encyclopaedia, fan-authored by Willis E. McNelly and published in 1984, is quasi-canonical. While Frank Herbert accepted much of what was presented in the Encyclopaedia (or at least didn’t contest it despite his endorsement), his son Brian Herbert has discredited the work. As a fan of the original series who (in a twist of irony) considers Brian Herbert’s books to be outside of the senior Herbert’s canon, I am happy to accept the Encyclopaedia. The Dune Encyclopaedia described Heighliners as:

a simple, featureless globe…a network of girders and cables…covered only by the light aluminum skin

In the spirit of the novels, no specific size was given.

SyFy’s Dune (2000)
The Heighliner in SyFy’s 2000 adaptation of Dune had was a framework of interlocked, counterrotating sections left open to space. Its interior volume was crosshatched with girders, spaceships and anchored modules which you can see it in action here.

So…
I consider a solid cylindrical Heighliner to be more canonical: Frank Herbert integrated visual elements from the film related to the Guild, back into the final two novels. His son continued to use continued to use these same elements. So if it is more canonical, it is through endurance. Brian Herbert also provided the length of a Heighliner in Dune: House Corrino: Twenty kilometres.

Annotated dimensions of a Heighliner

With that in hand, I went and screencapped Dune, brought it into Photoshop to take measurements. The Heighliner on my screen was 309.92 pixels long and 86.77 pixels wide. Let us apply…math!

(86.77 / 309.92) * 100 = 27.998

Rounded up, a Heighliner’s width is 28% that of its length. This isn’t great, but it is good enough. A further bit of math delivers the Heighliner’s approximate width:

20000 * 0.28 = 5600

For comparison: you can fit two Babylon 5’s facing each other end-to-end inside of a single Heighliner:

Babylon 5

Fanwankery aside, I took further measurements so I could draw it with the correct proportions:

20000:5600 = 25:7


in design

Mark Grealish

Dashing brigand, handsome rapscallion, father, crazy cat lady and the world's greatest lover and liar, living in Galway, Ireland.



Have your own say on 'The dimensions of a Heighliner':

Have your say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>